Digital Genetics

Archive for September, 2011

The science of heat

by on Sep.30, 2011, under nature, science

YOUR EYES ARE WATERING, your nose is running, and your mouth feels like an inferno. Instinctively, you reach for the glass of cold water in front of you and slosh the liquid down your throat. To your dismay, the water does almost nothing to douse the flames. If only you’d had a glass of full-cream milk – after all, that’s the common cure for chilli heat. Or is it?

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/why-chillies-are-hot-the-science-behind-the-heat.htm

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Caught Speeding?

by on Sep.23, 2011, under cool, science, technology

In a recent article posted on the BBC website, Scientists have found that some subatomic particles have appeared to exceed the speed of light. This find once fully explored and fully documented could have significant impacts on our current understanding of physics.

Jason Palmer writes:

Puzzling results from Cern, home of the LHC, have confounded physicists – because it appears subatomic particles have exceeded the speed of light.

Neutrinos sent through the ground from Cern toward the Gran Sasso laboratory 732km away seemed to show up a tiny fraction of a second early.

The result – which threatens to upend a century of physics – will be put online for scrutiny by other scientists.

To read the full article, visit:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15017484

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Researchers build Life-like cells made of metal

by on Sep.16, 2011, under cool, science, technology

Katherine Sanderson from NewScientist writes:

He has managed to build cell-like bubbles from giant metal-containing molecules and has given them some life-like properties. He now hopes to induce them to evolve into fully inorganic self-replicating entities.

“I am 100 per cent positive that we can get evolution to work outside organic biology,” says Lee Cronin at the University of Glasgow. His building blocks are large “polyoxometalates” made of a range of metal atoms – most recently tungsten – linked to oxygen and phosphorus. By simply mixing them in solution, he can get them to self-assemble into cell-like spheres.

This research certainly pushes our understanding of life into fascinating areas, whilst also raising some interesting debate. I personally am fascinated by the prospect and possible application of this technology in the realm of robotics.

To read the full article, visit:

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20906-lifelike-cells-are-made-of-metal.html

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