Digital Genetics

nature

The science of heat

by on Sep.30, 2011, under nature, science

YOUR EYES ARE WATERING, your nose is running, and your mouth feels like an inferno. Instinctively, you reach for the glass of cold water in front of you and slosh the liquid down your throat. To your dismay, the water does almost nothing to douse the flames. If only you’d had a glass of full-cream milk – after all, that’s the common cure for chilli heat. Or is it?

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/why-chillies-are-hot-the-science-behind-the-heat.htm

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Liquefication, promession & the mushroom death suit

by on Aug.31, 2011, under cool, nature, science, Society, technology

Have you ever considered the manner in which your body is disposed of when you die? Often I have pondered my existence on this comparatively tiny blue planet of ours, but never have I really considered this.

Until recently I thought that there were really only two options, burial and cremation, but prompted by a recent article by Neil Bowdler on the BBC News website, I started to research the subject in more depth, and now I realise that body disposal has become quite creative.

In his article, titled “New body ‘liquefaction’ unit unveiled in Florida funeral home‘ neil describes a device which works by:

Submerging the body in a solution of water and potassium hydroxide which is pressurised to 10 atmospheres and heated to 180C for between two-and-a-half and three hours.
Body tissue is dissolved and the liquid poured into the municipal water system. Mr Sullivan, a biochemist by training, says tests have proven the effluent is sterile and contains no DNA, and poses no environmental risk.

Whilst it may seem macarbe, this technique is far more environmentally friendly that tradition cremation techniques. For example, through the use of cremation, a single person can contribute over 200kg of air emissions.


Fig 1
the “alkaline hydrolysis” unit installed at a Florida funeral home.

In contrast to this method, Neil also discusses an alternate approach titled ‘Promession’. Promession is the brain child of a Swedish biologist named Susanne Wiigh-Masak, and is likened to a method of composting.

Promession is described as:

The process involves a fully automated and patented machine. Coffins are fed in one end, and the body removed from the coffin within the unit and then treated with liquid nitrogen.

The body is then vibrated until the body fragments, after which the remains are dried and refined further, and then passed through filters to remove metals, including dental amalgam. The remains are then poured into a square biodegradable coffin, again automatically, for shallow burial.

The combination of the tiny body fragments and the square biodegradable coffin, results in a smaller burial plot and hastens the decomposition process. Whilst I like the sound of my body getting so jiggy with it, that it breaks into thousands of pieces allowing for bite sized morsels for all sorts of soil bacteria and underground creatures, it is nowhere near as cool as the mushroom death suit!

The mushroom death suit is the work of an artist by the name of Jae Rhim Lee. Basicallly, it is a body suit embroidered with thread infused with mushroom spores. The design of which is inspired by the dendritic growth of mushroom mycelium.

According to Jae Rhim Lee the suit:

Is accompanied by an Alternative Embalming Fluid, a liquid spore slurry, and Decompiculture Makeup, a two-part makeup consisting of a mixture of dry mineral makeup and dried mushroom spores and a separate liquid culture medium. Combining the two parts and applying them to the body activates the mushroom spores to develop and grow.

The project is currently growing and training various mushroom cultivars in the hope of producing what she refers to as the ‘infinity mushroom’.

Jae Rhim Lee is training fungi to consume her own body tissue and excretions–skin, hair, nails, blood, bone, fat, tears, urine, feces, and sweat. The fungi have been chosen for their potential to utilize the nutrients in human tissue and to remediate industrial toxins in soil.

How do you plan to go in the end?

To read Neil Bowdler’s full article on liquefication and promession, visit:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-14114555

To learn more about the mushroom death suit, visit:
http://infinityburialproject.com/mushroom

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Moving forward?

by on Jan.24, 2011, under Environment, nature, Society, technology

According to a recent article posted on the Globe and mail website:

In September, a privately held and highly secretive U.S. biotech company named Joule Unlimited received a patent for “a proprietary organism” – a genetically engineered cyanobacterium that produces liquid hydrocarbons: diesel fuel, jet fuel and gasoline. This breakthrough technology, the company says, will deliver renewable supplies of liquid fossil fuel almost anywhere on Earth, in essentially unlimited quantity and at an energy-cost equivalent of $30 (U.S.) a barrel of crude oil. It will deliver, the company says, “fossil fuels on demand.”

Whilst it is an obvious step forward in terms of technology and zero dependence of raw materials, agricultural land, crops (ie. ethanol) or fresh water, i’m not convinced this is a step in a positive environment-oriented direction. It is essentially (as the globe and mail suggested) liquid hydrocarbons on demand.

For the full article, go to:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/opinion/a-brave-new-world-of-fossil-fuels-on-demand/article1871149/

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Pooktre Tree Shapers

by on Nov.19, 2010, under Art, nature, Woodwork

“In 1987 Peter had the idea of growing a chair. In 1995 Peter and Becky became life partners. One year later Pooktre was born. Together they have mastered the art of Tree shaping. Pooktre has perfected a Gradual shaping method, which is the shaping of trees as they grow along predetermined designs. Designing and setting up the supporting framework are fundamental to the success of a tree. Some are intended for harvest to be high quality indoor furniture and others will remain living art.”

For more information about Pooktre and this wonderfully creative team, please visit their website: http://www.pooktre.com/

Pete in the living garden chair

Pete in the living garden chair

http://www.pooktre.com
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Underwater Sculpture by Jason deCaires Taylor

by on Oct.14, 2010, under Art, nature, Society

What an inspirational and beautiful example of art. Not only will art like this drive further tourism dollars, but has the more important side effect of creating further awareness about our sensitive oceanic diversity and our need to protect it. Well done Jason!

“The first 200 sculptures are ready to be deployed in Cancun, Mexico in what will soon be the largest underwater museum in the world. The Museum of Underwater Art, created by internationally renowned sculpture and installation artist Jason deCaires Taylor, will feature more than 400 statues of real people when completed, forming a monumental artificial reef designed to promote marine life, increase bio-diversity and draw Cancun visitors gently away from existing reef habitats.” (GreenMuze 15 June, 2010. Retreived from http://www.greenmuze.com/nature/oceans/2742-cancun-underwater-sculpture-museum.html)

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